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Bikes, bicycles, pushbikes

20 Sep

It’s as easy as riding a bike. These photographs from the collection of the State Library of New South Wales celebrate the timeless joy of the bicycle.

Man on a penny-farthing bicycle being chased by his sister (Maggie & Bob Spiers) – West Wyalong, NSW, C. 1900

Billie Samuels leaving to ride to Melbourne on a Malvern Star bicycle, 4 July 1934, by Sam Hood

Close-up of Billie Samuels on the Malvern Star bike showing her koala bear mascot before leaving for Melbourne, 4 July 1934, by Sam Hood

Billie Samuels on a Malvern Star cycle leaving for Melbourne from Martin Place, 4 July 1934, by Sam Hood

Waratah Rovers Bicycle Club (WRBC) on tour. Sydney – Campbelltown – Appin – Bulli – South Coast. Photo taken at Picton – Picton, NSW, October 1900

Waratah Rovers Bicycle Club (WRBC) on tour. Sydney – Campbelltown – Appin – Bulli – South Coast. Photo taken at Picton outside the Royal Hotel – Picton, NSW, October 1900

Man and woman on a Malvern Star abreast tandem bicycle, c. 1930s, by Sam Hood

Alfred Lee and penny farthing, Glen Street, North Sydney, undated / photographer unknown

School teacher (Miss Marley) at Narraburra School – Narraburra, NSW, no date, by Eden Photo Studios

Jenolan Caves, April 1903, photographed by Edward J. Cooke

Man on bicycle pillioning boy – Bunaloo, NSW, n.d.

Brownie (Muriel Long) with bicycle decorated for street procession – Deniliquin, NSW, n.d.

Studio photograph of Annie Dawson Wallace seated on a bicycle – Sydney, NSW, 1899

Annie Dawson Wallace with her bicycle. NB- Annie is wearing trousers – Sydney, NSW, 1899

Waratah Rovers Bicycle Club (WRBC) 1898 – Sydney, NSW

Palace Emporium Bicycle Club. Century riders – Sydney area, NSW, July 1899

Scone Bicycle Club Road Race – Scone, NSW, 9 June 1906

Joyce Barry advertising for Milk Board, September 1939

A. H. Sheppard, Australian Champion, c. 1913

Reggie ‘Iron Man’ McNamara (1887-1971) was a champion Australian cyclist

Line up of competitors at Goulburn, Goulburn to Sydney, Dunlop Road Race, c. 1930s

Hubert Opperman eating an ice cream next to a Peter’s Ice Cream Reo truck,1936, by Sam Hood

Oppy (Hubert Opperman) and woman, possibly Edna Sayers, on tandem bicycle, by Sam Hood

Four cyclists on speed bicycles on rollers time trials to promote Malvern Star by Sam Hood

Cyclists camp during a road race, by Sam Hood

Two men in plus-fours on a tandem, by Sam Hood

Finish, Goulburn-Sydney Dunlop road race, Joseph St, Lidcombe, by Sam Hood

Boys of Hoyts Clovelly Theatre ‘Spider’s Web’ Club ride their bikes while ‘Spiderman’ looks on, by Sam Hood

Cycle races, including a six days race, at a Sydney velodrome, Moore Park, by Sam Hood

Jim and Nancy Davenport, Albury, NSW, 11 December 1938, by – J E N Davenport

Malvern Star Bicycle Competition, Stanmore Theatre (taken for Acme Theatres), 4 May 1946, by Sam Hood

Tom Morris, skipping champion (taken for Greater Union Theatres), 28 June 1937, by Sam Hood

Mr Waterhouse had the first motorcycle that came to Singleton and he built the front carrier for passenger – Singleton, NSW, n.d.

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Old Rally Cars (more)

6 Aug


Vintage Rally Cars

30 Jul

Speed Girls: the Bugatti Queen

23 Jul

Hellé Nice was born as Helene Delangle near Chartres as daughter of a postmaster, moved to Paris as teenager, posed for naughty photographs sold to tourists, and soon became one of the most popular and best known dancing acts in Paris in the mid 1920s.

She started racing through contacts with members of the French motorsport world, like Baron Philippe de Rothschild, and Le Mans winner Henri de Courcelles. Hellé Nice successfully competed in Grand Prix and set multiple speed records in the 1930s in Bugatti’s and Alfa Romeo’s.

Hellé Nice in an undated photograph (Jean-Pierre Poiter, Chelles, France/Random House)

Hellé Nice after her victory in the 1929 Grand Prix Féminin which secured her a sleek Bugatti and the nickname ”The Speed Queen.”

Hellé Nice in Rio de Janeiro leading the field in her Alfa Romeo with No. 2.

Indian America’s first motorcycle – The early years of cool innovation

22 May

Jungle Jim Liberman & Jungle Pam Hardy

20 Apr

Harley Davidson Hog Boys

16 Apr

Beginning in 1920, a team of farm boys, including Ray Weishaar, who became known as the “hog boys,” consistently won races. The group had a live hog as their mascot. Following a win, they would put the hog on their Harley and take a victory lap. In 1983, the Motor Company formed a club for owners of its product taking advantage of the long-standing nickname by turning “hog” into the acronym HOG., for Harley Owners Group. Harley-Davidson attempted to trademark “hog”, but lost a case against an independent Harley-Davidson specialist, The Hog Farm of West Seneca, NY, in 1999 when the appellate panel ruled that “hog” had become a generic term for large motorcycles and was therefore unprotectable as a trademark.