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Saigon, Vietnam in Old Pictures

26 Nov
Saigon Port (1866)

A wharf for merchant ships (1866)

Saigon port and a French-style street (1866)

A warship in the Saigon River (1866)

Boats in the Saigon River (1890)

Making entrance formalities at the Saigon Port (1890)

Saigon port

A construction site in Charner Street, in Saigon’s hub (1866)

Saigon Botanical Garden (1890)

Ben Nghe (1901)

Saigon Notre-Dame Basilica (1890)

St. Enfance Cathedral (1866)

Norodom Palace (1866)

Southern Governor Palace (1890)

Sentry box of a marine garrison (1901)

An ancient Buddhist temple of Vietnamese (1900)

Pagoda of Khmer people (1890)

A pagoda of Chinese Vietnamese (1890)

A tomb (1866)

Titanic Construction Photos

31 Oct

The doomed ship was built in Belfast over a three-year span and these impressive black and white images show just how colossal an undertaking it was.

(via)

Unseen Photos From the Sinking Titanic After 99 Years

25 Oct

John and Nelle Snyder, Titanic survivors, on April 18, 1912, the day they disembarked the Carpathia.

The images were made by John and Nelle Snyder, newlyweds who were celebrating their honeymoon aboard the Titanic. After being kept in the possession of the Snyder family for 99 years, the photos (along with some letters written on Titanic stationery) are expected to fetch over $50,000 when they’re auctioned on October 21st by Philip Weiss Auctions. (PetaPixel, via NYTimes)

RMS Titanic

19 Sep

RMS Titanic was a passenger liner that struck an iceberg on her maiden voyage from Southampton, England, to New York City, and sank on 15 April 1912, resulting in the deaths of 1,517 people in one of the deadliest peacetime maritime disasters in history.

A McDonald’s and a Barge Merge

14 Aug

This was built for Expo ’86 in Vancouver, British Columbia. It’s a McDonald’s restaurant that was built on a barge. It’s first floating McDonald’s anywhere in the world. While the barge was permitted to operate in a new location after the exhibition, the derelict barge has been anchored empty in Burrard Inlet, among an oil refinery and industrial barges since 1991.

RMS Lusitania

25 Apr

RMS Lusitania was an ocean liner designed by Leonard Peskett and built by John Brown and Company of Clydebank, Scotland which entered service with the Cunard Line on 26 August 1907. She was named after the ancient Roman province of Lusitania, which is part of present day Portugal. During World War I as Germany waged submarine warfare against Britain, the ship was identified and torpedoed by a German U-boat U-20 on 7 May 1915 and sank in eighteen minutes. It went down eleven miles (19 km) off the Old Head of Kinsale, Ireland, killing 1,198 of the 1,959 people aboard, leaving 761 survivors. The sinking turned public opinion in many countries against Germany, contributed to the American entry into World War I and became an iconic symbol in recruiting campaigns of why the war was being fought.

in drydock in Halifax Nova Scotia in 1900

at Liverpool landing stage

in 1911

Antarctica in Color, 1915

20 Mar

These are Frank Hurley’s famous early colour photographs of Sir Ernest Shackleton’s ill-fated ‘Endurance’ voyage, as part of the British Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition, 1914-1917. Hurley was the official photographer on the expedition.

Early in 1915, their ship ‘Endurance’ became inexorably trapped in the Antarctic ice. Hurley managed to salvage the photographic plates by diving into mushy ice-water inside the sinking ship in October 1915.

[via Damn Cool Pics]